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can do if the u.s. heads into recession because of the fiscal cliff, bernanke says, not much. >> in the worse case scenario, where the economy goes off the broad fiscal cliff, the largest fiscal cliff, which, according the c.b.o. and our analys, would send the u.s. economy into recession, i don't think the fed has the tools to offset that. >> susie: members of the audience agreed. >> he was very frank in saying, you know, "we can try," he essentially said, "we will try, but we don't have anything in our arsenal that comes close." >> susie: bernanke is already using the weapons in his arsenal to fix the job market, which he said today is still "unhealthy". he also repeated the fed's plan to keep interest rates super low at least into 2015. >> we will want to be sure that the recovery is established before we begin to normalize policy. we hope that such assurances will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence among households and businesses. >> susie: but bernanke gave no hints on when americans can expect to see higher rates. >> the further we go down the road, the question
folks are looking for-- and i think all of us agree on this-- is action. >> reporter: speaker pelosi suggested the leaders agree on milestones that will bolster the economy. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should show some milestones of success so that confidence can build as we reach our solution. >> reporter: over the last week markets had grown increasingly pessimistic about avoiding the fiscal cliff. today's tone provided some relief, but it's clear major hurdles remain. >> how much do rates have to go up? what can republicans accept on that and what can the democrats accept in terms of structural reform of entitlements? i think those are the two big sticking points and those are going to remain the sticking points. and if you can figure out what's going to happen there, you can figure out whether there is going to be a deal and when that deal might happen. >> serious negotiating begins after thanksgiving. susie. >> susie: you know, darren, you talked about the mood of cooperation, and listening to th
a short- run compromise that will get us past the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: the president made his suggestion for a short-term deal. he urged congress to extend tax breaks for the middle class while they work out a bigger plan for a grand bargain. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: while investors remain focused on the fiscal cliff, a further jump in consumer sentiment helped stocks close in the green today. the university of michigan reuters consumer sentiment index this month rose to 84.9. that's its highest level since july of 2007. the dow added four points, the nasdaq was up nine, the s&p 500 added two points. for the week overall, the dow fell 2.1%. the nasdaq dropped 2.6%. and the s&p 500 is 2.4% lower tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to se
. tom will be along later in the program. congress officially gets back to preventing the u.s. economy from falling off the fiscal cliff. while washington struggles on a fiscal cliff deal, what should you do about your portfolio? jeff applegate has some answers. he's chief investment officer at morgan stanley smith barney. and home depot hammers home strong gains and lays the foundation for a strong quarter ahead. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." it was another day of cliff- watching here on wall street today. investors and traders are waiting to hear what happens at an important white house meeting on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and g
for business leaders. the c.e.o. of caesars entertainment, tells us it'll be "very damaging" for his company. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! wall street greeted the election results with a big sell-off in stocks. investors dumped shares of almost every type, giving the s&p 500 it's worst day since june. beyond the u.s. elections, europe also brought fresh worries for investors with concerns in greece, and germany. here's how the numbers stacked up on wall street. the dow lost 312 points, at it's worst point of the day, the blue chip index was down 369 points. the nasdaq tumbled nearly 75 points and the s&p 500 off 33. suzanne pratt takes a look at where the market goes from here. >> reporter: let's be candid. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new
with lawmakers today joins us. he is david cote, c.e.o. of honeywell. david, thank you so much for joining us. we really appreciate it. did you get the sense from house speaker boehner, he is ready to make a deal? >> i would say there is a recognition on all sides about the significance and importance of a deal. it is a real question about gettin both sides en the room to actually hammer it out and get something done because we don't have a lot of time left. >> susie: president obama said he would like to have a deal by christmas. from what you heard today, how realistic is that? >> if they want to, they can get this done in a couple of days. it is just a matter of kind of working out some of these important details. but it's a matter, i think, they just need to get together and get started. i think both recognize the need for a market-credible $4 trillion deal, and it has got to comprise both tax increases that are believable and that will happen, and entitlement reform that is believable and will happen. both of those things will have to be an important rt of this. >> susie: did speaker boehner
voted again for obama because he does not have... things can change in a day. president bush left us in a very very bad position, so things cannot change in a day. so that's why i'm giving president obama another chance. >> we do have a business and it does seem to have picked up a little bit. not great, but a little bit. >> tom: coming into election day, governor romney has been leading president obama in the latest miami herald statewide florida polls by about six points. that's because of growing support for governor romney in central florida and northern florida, areas with housing markets still struggling and with unemployment rates generally above the national average. >> susie: that's really fascinating, tom, sort of like the tale of two cities. what about south florida, what about voters in the rest of florida? >> tom: south florida is an interesting case, the housing bust certainly happened here in miami in south florida. but thanks to foreign buyers coming back in, the housing market has stablized faster than in the rest of florida, and prices are actually on the rise again
street tumbled: the dow fell 185 points, the nasdaq lost 37, the s&p was down 19. james awad joins us now. he's investment strategist at zephyr management. >> so, jim, what do you think investors need to hear from the president that they feel confident about investing in the markets? >> right now, there is nothing he is willing to do that would make investors comfortable. you'll notice today that the market sold off during and after his press conference because he was very aggressive in his position. and whether that's a negotiating point or not, i think what the markets fear is that we could either accidentally go over the cliff, or that all this hard posturing will set in stage a series of contractionery economic activities on the parts of businesses, in terms of not hiring, and maybe firing, and businesses shrinking rather than expanding, which will eventually find its way into consumer attitudes. so i think the market is afraid that this gun battle, or dual or chess game will lead to an accidental recession. >> sue: all right. let me follow up on that. a lot of the traders i've been t
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)